Alaska Railroad and Boretide Surfing!

Things to Do in Alaska

Bobette and I were blessed by a friend to take a day trip on the Alaska Railroad down and around the coastal town of Seward.

We saw bore tide surfers, Click here to watch great video of this.

glaciers, ate scrumptious meals, and visited the Alaska Sea Life Center in Seward. Below is Bobette taking a picture of me taking a picture of her and the town of Seward behind her

Another great view (below) is looking out across Palmer where the State Fair is held each year.  This year a 1469 pound pumpkin broke the state record! I got lots of response on Facebook with this picture!


img_0779Palmer is Palmer Alaska is located off the icy glaciers at windspeeed sometimes of over 100 mph!  Alaskans must be prepared for this type of weather on a regular basis even on a clear day as shown by this picture!

Together in the Harvest,
Cinderella Released
from ashes to beauty…to declare His Glory!


Bobette taking a picture of me taking a picture!



Big Lake – Alaska


Located on the shore of its namesake lake and sprawling over 138 square miles is the community of Big Lake, with a population of 3,191 people and many, many more sled dogs, including the kennel of four-time Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race champion Martin Buser.


About Big Lake

Many residents of Big Lake commute to work in Anchorage, 60 miles to the south, but choose to live in Big Lake for its limitless recreation opportunities and the views of Mount Susitna, Denali and the Talkeetna Mountains.













Author Bobette Stubblefield
 The “It” Factor – Keeping It Simple

Things to do

Not surprisingly, recreation in the area centers around the lake, and it is indeed big, with 67 miles of shoreline. Popular activities include swimming, camping, boating, fishing, jet skiing and tour boat rides in the summer; in the winter, snowmobile competitions, dog mushing, ice fishing and cross-country skiing dominate the lake’s frozen surface.

Big Lake North State Recreation Site is located on the lake and has overnight parking spaces, walk-in tent sites, picnic area, shelters and an outstanding view of Denali on a clear day. Also nearby is Fish Creek Park, a popular day-use area with a salmon spawning observation deck; Big Lake South State Recreation Site with campsites and a boat launch on the lake; and Rocky Lake State Recreation Site with camping on a lake closed to jet skis, jet boats and air boats.

Article courtesy of Travel Alaska. Com

For His Kingdom,

Cinderella Releasedfrom ashes to beauty…declaring God’s Glory!

Cinderella Released Logo

Returning Home to J



Of course I was so happy to return home to see little Jonah.  He is almost ten months old and he has stolen my heart!  He is a little worshiper and loves to dance, even though he can’t walk yet!

My son M, daughter A and grand baby Jare getting ready to leave for Asia.  Please visit their website to learn more about their plans! Their testimony is one of great love and faith. A mother and grandmother couldn’t be prouder or sadder as I think about how time is slipping away! They will be traveling to Tallahassee, Orlando, and North Carolina to share about what God is doing in their lives, and to say goodbye to family before leaving early 2017.  Please Keep them in your prayers!
Their newsletters will not be public since they are going to a very sensitive area but if you would like to sign up for their paper newsletter, they would love to send it to you.


Cinderella Released
from ashes to beauty…to declare God’s Glory!

Mother and Child & the Northern Lights

Experienced the Great Northern Lights!
One night I saw a Northern Light show and one of the formations looked like a mother with a baby in her womb… The baby was moving… It was breathtaking and actually overwhelming emotionally. (I later received a prophetic word about being pregnant and delivering a message of hope and salvation to the Alaskan people!) Wow! What more can I say… God has been speaking to me in a huge way.
Enjoy a video of the Northern Lights Click Here.
One night before I left, Samantha, the Stubblefield’s English Setter was let out around midnight and let out a howl!  Bobette called me to hurry and come!  There on the front lawn as peaceful and safe as you could imagine was a mother moose with her calf.  This was another sign (I believe) that God was watching over G3 Alaska Ministries and the place I would hopefully call home soon!

Eat More Salmon!



Health Benefits

“Only one food has the reputation from time immemorial of being a “brain food”. That food is fish… you should plan to eat a seafood meal seven days a week — and salmon at least five times a week.”
– Nicholas Perricone, M.D., “The Perricone Prescription”


Few single foods can bring as many health contributions to your diet in significant quantities as wild Alaskan salmon. Wild salmon is an excellent source of Omega-3 fatty acids which are necessary for optimum maternal and infant health.

Main benefits from wild salmon:

  • Omega 3 fatty acids
  • High Quality Protein
  • Essential Amino Acids
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B
  • Vitamin E
  • Appreciable amounts of calcium, iron, zinc, magnesium, and phosphorus

All these benefits combine to make wild Alaskan sockeye salmon the natural choice for anyone concerned with their own or their family’s health.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids:

  • Protect heart health
  • Reduce risk of sudden death from heart disease
  • Reduce risk of stroke
  • Reduce chance of heart disease in Type 2 Diabetes
  • Essential in infant brain and eye development during pregnancy and infancy
  • Improve blood lipid patterns
  • Improve blood vessel function
  • Improve symptoms of immune and inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease and some skin conditions
  • Reduce the risk of some mental disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and depression

The protective role of fish against heart disease and cancer may be attributed to the type of oil found in certain species of coldwater fish, especially Alaska salmon. These fish oils, referred to as “Omega-3”, are polyunsaturated. Their chemical structure and metabolic function are quite different from the polyunsaturated oils found in vegetable oils, known as “Omega-6”.

The type of dietary fat (monounsaturated, saturated, or polyunsaturated) we consume alters the production of a group of biological compounds known as eicosanoids(prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes). These eicosanoids have biological influences on blood pressure, blood clotting, inflammation, immune function, and coronary spasms. In the case of Omega-3 oils, a series of eicosanoids are produced, which may result in a decreased risk of heart disease, inflammatory processes, and certain cancers.

Omega-3 oils also exert additional protective effects against coronary heart disease by:

  • decreasing blood lipids (cholesterol, low-density lipoproteins or LDL, and triglycerides)
  • decreasing blood clotting factors in the vascular system
  • increasing relaxation in larger arteries and other blood vessels
  • decreasing inflammatory processes in blood vessels

Additional studies have provided exciting news about the benefits of Omega-3 oils for individuals with arthritis, psoriasis, ulcerative colitis, lupus erythematosus, asthma, and certain cancers. Research studies have consistently shown that Omega-3 fatty acids delay tumor appearance, and decrease the growth, size, and number of tumors.

A recent study at the University of Washington has confirmed that eating a modest amount of salmon (one salmon meal per week) can reduce the risk of primary cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest claims the lives of 250,000 Americans each year. Fresh, fresh-frozen, or canned Alaska sockeye salmon provides the highest amount of Omega-3 fatty acids of any fish — 2.7 grams per 100 gram portion.

Other studies, such as the Zupthen Study, a 20-year investigation of a Dutch population, confirmed similar benefits. The risk of coronary heart disease decreased (as much as 2.5 times) with increasing fish consumption. This suggests that moderate amounts (one to two servings per week) of fish are of value in the prevention of coronary heart disease, when compared with no fish intake.

The type of dietary fat we consume is very important. It has been well documented that saturated fat can increase the risk of heart disease. The amount of saturated fat in both high-oil fish and lean fish is minimal. Fish, and other seafood, also offers lean, high-quality protein, as well as many other important vitamins and minerals.

Vitamin E:

  • Powerful antioxidant
  • Lowers the risk of heart disease
  • Prevents the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins
  • Reduces the buildup of plaque in coronary arteries

Salmon is also a good source of Vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants, which also include Vitamin C and beta carotene, act at the molecular level to deactivate free radicals. Free radicals can damage basic genetic material, and cell walls and structures, to eventually lead to cancer and heart disease. Vitamin E lowers the risk of heart disease by preventing the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), thus reducing the buildup of plaque in coronary arteries. Other research has found that Vitamin E plays a protective role against cancer and the formation of cataracts, and may possibly boost the immune system in the elderly.

Fish Nutrient Values:

Trying to keep track of your caloric intake, or just interested in the nutritional content of your seafood meals?  Use the link below to find out number of calories, grams of protein and fat, and other nutritional values for all the Alaska seafood we carry.×11.pdf

Mercury Concerns:

Is mercury or mercury poisoning a concern for you? Women who are pregnant or breast feeding, children under 12, and those who eat a predominately seafood diet need to be aware of their level of mercury consumption.  Mercury is a naturally occurring element that is found at some level the world over. Fish that come from heavily polluted fisheries, are slow growing or can attain a substantial weight are all more likely to have a higher mercury level than those fish that have shorter life spans and are harvested from clean fisheries.

Alaska Seafood comes from some of the cleanest fisheries in the world, and as a result, have lower mercury levels than most wild caught seafood.  In fact all species of wild salmon, young halibut and ling cod, Alaska pacific cod, and black rockfish are so low in their mercury content that there are no dietary restrictions on the amounts anyone can eat of these species. The links below provide mercury levels for some popular species of fish, and dietary recommendations for the consumption of fish, based on their mercury levels.

Consumption guidelines:

Mercury levels in popular seafood:

Alaska’s Alarming Statistics


Below are just a few of the statistics and a few of the signs and wonders I was able to witness while I was there.

Suicide # 3 in Alaska

The largest state in the U.S. has the highest suicide rate. In 2007, for every 100,000 Alaskans, 21.8 died by suicide.

Credit: istockphoto

Prostitution number 7 highest in the United States

Native Alaskans – have trouble with adjusting to current life situations in Alaska

Number One State for Alcohol Abuse –

Unemployment Rates High in Alaska