Endurance – The Iditarod = Alaskan Sled Dog Race

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The Iditarod – Alaskan Sled Dog Race

Passion, Vision and Mission

I only know that in every city the Holy Spirit warns me that prison and hardships are facing me. 24 However, I consider my life worth nothing to me; my only aim is to finish the race and complete the task the Lord Jesus has given me—the task of testifying to the good news of God’s grace. Acts 23-24

I do all this for the sake of the gospel, that I may share in its blessings.
I Corinthians 9:23-25

The Need for Self-Discipline

Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.

Endurance

I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. 
2 Timothy 4:7

Iditarod

Portions of the Iditarod Trail were used by the Native Alaskan Eskimo Inupiaq and Athabaskan peoples hundreds of years before the arrival of Russian fur traders in the 1800s, but the trail reached its peak between the late 1880s and the mid-1920s as miners arrived to dig coal and later gold, especially after the Alaska gold rushes at Nome in 1898,[10] and at the “Inland Empire” along the Kuskokwim Mountains between Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers, in 1908.

mail

The primary communication and transportation link to the rest of the world during the summer was the steamship; but between October and June the northern ports like Nome became icebound, and dog sleds delivered mail, firewood, mining equipment, gold ore, food, furs, and other needed supplies between the trading posts and settlements across the Interior and along the western coast. Roadhouses where travelers could spend the night sprang up every 14 to 30 miles (23 to 48 km) until the end of the 1920s, when the mail carriers were replaced by bush pilots flying small aircraft and the roadhouses vanished. Dog sledding persisted in the rural parts of Alaska, but was almost driven into extinction by the spread of snowmobiles in the 1960s.

great race

 

The most famous event in the history of Alaskan mushing is the 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the “Great Race of Mercy.” A large diphtheria epidemic threatened Nome, and Nome’s supply of antitoxin had expired and doctor Curtis Welch refused to use it, and then proceeded to send out telegrams looking for a fresh supply of antitoxin. The nearest antitoxin was found to be in Anchorage, nearly one thousand miles away. The only way to get the antitoxin to Nome was by sled dog, due to unusable planes and ships. Governor Scott Bone approved a safe route and the 20-pound (9.1 kg) cylinder of serum was sent by train 298 miles (480 km) from the southern port of Seward to Nenana, where it was passed just before midnight on January 27 to the first of twenty mushers and more than 100 dogs who relayed the package 674 miles (1,085 km) from Nenana to Nome. The dogs ran in relays, with no dog running over 100 miles (160 km).

 

balto
Balto

 

The Norwegian Gunnar Kaasen and his lead dog Balto arrived on Front Street in Nome on February 2 at 5:30 a.m., just five and a half days later. The two became media celebrities, and a statue of Balto was erected in Central Park in New York City in 1925, where it has become one of the most popular tourist attractions.

Seppala&Togo3

However, most mushers consider Leonhard Seppala and his lead dog Togo to be the true heroes of the run. Together they covered the most hazardous stretch of the route, and carried the serum 91 miles, the single farthest of any team.[12]john 812

Please pray for the people of Alaska and that God’s light will overcome the darkness as many face tremendous challenges of hardship, crisis and trauma.

Searching for God’s Treasure

Marlene

Baby it's cold outside

 

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Author: cinderellareleased

Bio Marlene was raised in Central Florida, the daughter of a 12th generation farmer and part Cherokee mother. She learned at an early age to work hard and to love God. She first met Jesus at the tender age of six sitting in an orange tree in her backyard in Sanford, Florida. This was when she first felt a call to the nations. She is mother to four sons, three grandchildren, and many spiritual sons and daughters. Isaiah 54 is her life chapter. It was from that scripture God gave her two specific promises about her physical children. “All your children will be taught of the Lord and have great peace.”(Isaiah 54:13) and, “Your decedents will occupy other nations and resettle the ruined cities.” (Isaiah 54:3). Marlene has been called to go wherever and by whatever means God leads and guides; making disciples, assisting and caring for the children He sends her way. This could be across the street or across the world. It could be to the jailhouse, or to someone’s penthouse or simply a backyard BBQ. But wherever she is, her desire is to bring hope and healing to a lost generation. She has a heart for the lost, backslidden and broken. Her desire is to love and know the Lord fully and unconditionally, growing in His grace and wisdom; becoming His perfect bride, without spot or wrinkle. God created us to be beautiful. She wants to know and become God’s treasure on this earth and to help others become God’s treasured people also. God searches today for those who will make Him their single desire, who will say with the Psalmist and King David that, “the Lord is the portion of mine inheritance” (Psalm 16:5). They will be His special possession because, “the Lord hath chosen Jacob unto Himself, and Israel for His peculiar treasure” (Psalm 135:4). 850-661-6104 CinderellaReleased.Me marlene@CinderellaReleased.com Webpage http://cinderellareleased.wixsite.com/cinderellareleased

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